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From The GQ History

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Gentlemen’s Quarterly

We all know and love GQ (originally Gentlemen’s Quarterly) magazine for its interesting and entertaining monthly articles. This men’s magazine reveals fashionstyle, and culture for men by focusing on sports, music, movies, travel, food, sex, books, and technology. GQ(GQ History) is one of those entertaining male magazines that is equivalent to women’s Cosmopolitan or Vogue.

Did you know that GQ was firstly launched in the U.S. in 1931 as a men’s fashion magazine called Apparel Arts? It focused basically on wholesale buyers and retail sellers and wasn’t as popular as it is nowadays. It was industry insiders who entirely used to buy the magazine to give fashion advice to their customers. In 1933 the Esquire magazine was created and until 1957 Apparel Arts men’s magazine was published by Esquire Inc. Only in 1958 did Apparel Arts transform into the name Gentlemen’s Quarterly.Gentlemen’s Quarterly

Probably no one could predict that with many transformations, later on, GQ would be a major competitor for Esquire. In 1979 GQ publication changed its course turning it into a men’s magazine far beyond fashion. The magazine’s new owner Conde Nast Publications gradually started launching international editors to its team and this, of course, changed the magazine’s direction in various spheres.

In 1984, an editor at Harper’s Bazaar and Mademoiselle–Nonnie Moore was hired by GQ as a fashion editor. GQ’s fashion director Jim Moore talked about hiring Nonnie:

She was not from men’s wear, so people said she was an odd choice, but she was actually the perfect choice” and noting that she changed the publication’s more casual look, which “She helped dress up the pages, as well as dress up the men, while making the mix more exciting and varied and approachable for men.Gentlemen’s Quarterly

With the new chief editor – Jim Nelson, GQ was mostly oriented toward younger readers. Nelson is GQ’s fourth editor hired from February 2003 until the present.

Critics often say that GQ is associated with metrosexuality and we can interpret this statement differently. In an article for the British newspaper The Independent, the writer Tom Simpson stated:

The promotion of metrosexuality was left to the men’s style press, magazines such as The Face, GQ, Esquire, Arena and FHM, the new media which took off in the Eighties and is still growing…. They filled their magazines with images of narcissistic young men sporting fashionable clothes and accessories. And they persuaded other young men to study them with a mixture of envy and desire.Gentlemen’s Quarterly

GQ is published in 15 countries in Australia, South Africa, France, Spain, China, Germany, Italy, India, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Latin America, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. It is published in English, French, Russian, German, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Japanese, Korean, Turkish, and even Romanian.

Indeed, GQ is the most popular men’s magazine amongst both male and female populations. It is a great publication that has much to offer men who are interested to be the best of the best.

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Art toys: a new for of art

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featured image 1 Art toys: a new for of art

Is it a plaything? Is it some kind of artwork? To be more accurate, none of the two options. In this third and last instalment of our three-part series on Art Toys, we will delve further into the fascinating world of valuable miniature figures known as Art Toys. This first section will serve as an introduction to the “toy freakism,” which will be shown to you in its most unadulterated form. From its roots and origins in Hong Kong, through the wide range of styles it encompasses, and the most influential artists it has produced. Just a word of caution: it may hook you, so watch out.

The collection of art toys, often known as designer toys, emerged as a brand-new and game-changing subfield on the art market some twenty or so years ago. A mode of creative expression that is typically practised by designers and artists that hail from the fields of street art, animation, graphic design, and either anime or manga. This world is a cosmos filled with endless options for artists to express their creativity thanks to its explosion of colour and shape in a wide range of dimensions and materials.

This new version has very little to do with the hobby of collecting memorabilia, but they do have one thing in common: their audience. The so-called kidults (kid and adult) are a segment of the adult population that takes pleasure in stocking their shelves with as many of these “dolls” as physically feasible. These collectible figurines are the object of desire and attraction for the kidults. Kidults are fans of the message that these aesthetics, which inspire a return to childhood, are trying to convey. This adoration goes beyond the aesthetics. The surface of many of these paintings belies deeper meanings that include humour, irony, and messages of societal critique. However, the reason for this mania is that the prices range from only a few euros to numbers with up to three and four zeros, which opens the door to new collectors as well as seasoned collectors who have a variety of preferences and financial capabilities.

The question is, where and how did this demand for creative toys first start?

In the middle of the 1990s, Michael Lau, a person who is now regarded as the “father” of the Art Toys movement, began to make a name for himself in Hong Kong. This was the beginning of the phrase “Art Toys.” This Japanese artist started using vinyl in the production and design of limited-edition toys about the same time. In addition, this new trend was pushed forward by the establishment of Medicom Toy in Japan. Medicom Toy was the first company to specialise in the production and sale of collectible works created by artists who produced their most unique and specialised limited editions. This company was the driving force behind the new trend. What was at first an idea for a toy eventually began to find a home for itself in the realm of art.

This opened up a new space for urban artists, allowing them to communicate their artistic expression to a new audience and explore in a new media at the same time. [Citation needed] [Citation needed] Producing a commercial boom and adapting mainstream and mass culture into little works of art, we discover artists such as the American KAWS with his first “Companion” in 1998 and 1999, the Japanese Takashi Murakami with “Miss Ko2,” or the American Ron English with “MC Supersized,” amongst many others. Not only can many of these special items only be seen in art galleries or museums today, but sales on the secondary market have reached prices that are inconceivable to the average person. Works that are hardly older than 20 years are tripling in price and breaking records at auction houses.

The well-known figure created by KAWS is called “COMPANION,” and it has existed in a variety of guises, including a large 11-story inflatable and an 8-foot sculpture. KAWS is responsible for the creation of a wide variety of works, some of which include figures made of bronze, aluminium, fibreglass, rubberized synthetic materials, and wood. At auction, paintings by KAWS have brought in multiple millions of dollars, while large-scale sculptures by the artist have brought in tens of thousands. However, even the art figures he creates attract attention. The artist’s 9.5-inch plastic model known as “Accomplice – Pink” may be purchased for $15,180, and his 10.7-inch wooden figure known as “KAWS Karimoku Companion” has an estimated worth of $22,280.

featured image 1 Art toys: a new for of art

KAWS (American, b. 1974), COMPANION (PASSING THROUGH), executed in 2011. Painted bronze. 120 x 79.5 x 71 cm (47¼ x 31¼ x 28 in). Sold for CNY 2,640,000 on 24 September 2017 at Christie’s in The Peninsula Hotel Shanghai. Artwork: © KAWS

We are in the midst of a genuine artistic revolution in which art has entered the world of commerce and business. As a result of this, many artists have been able to establish a brand that is instantly recognisable thanks to Art Toys, which has allowed them to expand their customer base into industries other than the traditional art market, such as the retail, music, and even food industries.

This craze, which in the past few decades has already reached a global status, has captivated personalities such as the singer Pharrel Williams, an avid collector of these toys. He curated “This Is Not A Toy,” one of the first exhibitions on Art Toys, where he showed a large part of his collection in Toronto. This mania has already reached a global status in the past few decades.

It is undeniably astonishing to observe the scale that this movement has gained in a little under two decades; but, it opens up a number of cans that call into question the position of Art Toy itself within the art market. Is the recent surge in popularity of art toys just a fleeting fad, or has it arrived in the world of art with the intention of staying there? Time will tell, but in the meanwhile, we can’t help but join its universe to find out about all kinds of desires.

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What You Didn’t Know About “Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows”

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Harry Potter And The Deathly

A week ago the premiere of the final episode of the Harry Potter franchise was held in Trafalgar Square in London. Some movie reviewers noted that in a definite sense the last part of Harry Potter And The Deathly2 What You Didn’t Know About “Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows” Hallows” film was even better than the book.

Perhaps the greatest triumph of this final film is its ability to overcome the deficiencies of J K Rowling’s writing

What made the last film about Harry Potter so special? Here are some interesting facts:

1) The final episode of the movie was subjected to retake as technical problems emerged during the montage. However at this time, the King’s Cross station wasn’t rented, so, the actors had to play in the pavilion.

2) The last episode of the movie contained the scenes of adult heroes (19 years after). The characters already had wives/husbands and children; so, Draco Malfoy’s wife was played by Tom Felton’s (Draco Malfoy) girlfriend Jade Olivia who is a stunt assistant. Tom Felton:Harry Potter And The Deathly What You Didn’t Know About “Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows”

The producers actually came to me about six months ago and asked me, and I was like, OK, I’ll ask her. She was slightly reluctant but I pulled her arm and twisted it and then she was filming with me for three days at King’s Cross.

3) If Who didn’t read the book or watched the last movie, it’s not recommended to read this paragraph. Alan Rickman (Severus Snape) was the only person who knew one plot detail ten years ago. As it was revealed in “Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows” Part 2, Severus Snape was in love with Harry‘s mother. J.K. Rowling believed that this awareness will help the actor to create his character.

Harry Potter And The Deathly

4) The scene of Ron and Hermione kissing was being retaken 10 times (compare: Ron and Lavanda Brown – 15 times, Harry and Cho Chang – 30 times).

5) Rupert Grint exulted when he learned his character was not supposed to die. If you remember there was an intrigue created by J.K. Rowling. The writer told that some of the major heroes would die. Rupert thought that Harry wouldn’t die as he was the main person and Hermione was just a girl. So, Ron probably could be J.K. Rowling’s “victim”… Fortunately, he was wrong.

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15 Movies Everybody Should Watch

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Forrest Gump 15 Movies Everybody Should Watch

Have you ever experienced the feeling that you want something to watch but you don’t know what exactly? If it happens, it’s a good time to make up leeway – watch the 15 Movies everybody should watch. However the list you can see below consists of the films which provoke thinking. So, if you want to relax, maybe it’s not your best decision of yours to choose one of them. However, in the case, you don’t want just “consuming” but rethinking your own life, then go ahead!
1. Gone With the WindGone With the Wind e1658582897529 15 Movies Everybody Should Watch
2. It’s a Wonderful Life
3. Schindler’s List
4. The Godfather
5. The Godfather, Part II
6. Fight Club
7. Pulp Fiction
8. The Notebook
9. The Matrix
10. La Dolce VitaLa Dolce Vita 15 Movies Everybody Should Watch
11. The Hours
12. Star Wars
13. Groundhog Day
14. Casablanca
15. Forrest GumpForrest Gump 15 Movies Everybody Should Watch

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